Home Science Did You Ever Knew That Your Doppelganger Is Out There ?

Did You Ever Knew That Your Doppelganger Is Out There ?

There may be seven people in the world who look exactly like you. At some point in your life, you may have wondered whether there is anybody else on Earth who could look so much like you. According to experts, there are currently more than 8 billion people on Earth, this is a genuine prospect. Several fortunate internet users recounted the most bizarre instances in which they met their identical duplicate, proving the reality of doppelgangers.

According to the BBC, the likelihood of discovering an exact match is one in 135. It’s hardly shocking, given those chances, that some individuals have tracked down their doppelgängers.

Finding individuals who have comparable interests is a source of great excitement here at Viraltrendzs. Here is another list of rare appearance matches. Reality teaches us that all it takes to find your twin is to attend a hockey game.

Charlie Chasen and Michael Malone, Atlanta, 2014

Charlie Chasen and Michael Malone, Atlanta, 2014.
Image credits : François Brunelle

In 1997, Charlie Chasen and Michael Malone first met up in Atlanta. It was around this time that Mr. Malone sang with Mr. Chasen’s band as a special guest. Almost instantly, they hit it off and became fast friends. However, they were blind to what was going on around them. The two guys might easily be mistaken for twins given how identical they each look.

Mr. Malone and Mr. Chasen are doppelgangers. They are unrelated to one another, although they are very similar to one another. Their most recent ancestors did not even originate from the same regions of the planet. In contrast to Mr. Malone’s parents, who come from the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, Mr. Chasen’s ancestors originated in Lithuania and Scotland.

The Canadian photographer François Brunelle, used the two friends and hundreds of other doppelgangers in a project. Mr. Brunelle’s discovery that the English actor Rowan Atkinson resembled him inspired him to create the picture series “I’m not a look-alike!”.

Elisa Berst and Corinne Barois, Paris, 2010

Elisa Berst and Corinne Barois, Paris, 2010.
Image credits : François Brunelle

A lot of people all across the internet are very into this project. However, it has also piqued the interest of scientists and other researchers who examine the relationships between genes.

Previously, Dr. Manel Esteller, a researcher at the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute in Barcelona, Spain, examined the potential differences in appearance between identical twins. He was also fascinated by the occurrence of unrelated persons who have very identical physical features. He was perplexed by the causes of these people’s looks.

32 pairs of doppelgangers from Mr. Brunelle’s project were collected by Dr. Esteller and his team, who then had them undergo DNA testing for a study that was later published in the journal Cell Reports. A detailed questionnaire concerning their lives was also taken.

Facial recognition software was used to put a number on the degree to which study subjects shared facial features. Sixteen of the 32 pairs had overall scores that were comparable to identical twins assessed using the same program. The researchers checked to determine whether the 16 sets of doppelgangers were as genetically similar as they seemed by comparing their DNA.

Ana Maria Sánchez and Katherine Romero, Bogotá, Colombia, 2014

Ana Maria Sánchez and Katherine Romero, Bogotá, Colombia, 2014
Image credits : François Brunelle

Dr. Esteller found that the 16 pairings who were real look-alikes shared a lot more DNA than the other 16 couples, who the program thought to be less similar. He asserts that their remarkable likeness is the result of the fact that they share significant parts of a common genome (or DNA sequence). Additionally, he said that while it sounds clear, there has never been any proof that individuals who share more features are genetically similar.

Although our DNA plays a significant role in determining our identities, it is not the only factor. What scientists call epigenomes are the sets of genes that are turned on and off based on environmental cues, such as our own and our ancestors’ experiences. The microbiome—a community of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, and viruses that serve as our small co-pilot—is also influenced by our surroundings. Although the doppelgängers’ genomes were identical, Dr. Esteller found that their microbiomes and epigenomes were unique. In his view, genetics linked them, but epigenetics and the microbiome serve to keep them apart.

Pedro López Soto and Albert Pueyo Kaotico, Barcelona, 2015

Pedro López Soto and Albert Pueyo Kaotico, Barcelona, 2015.
Image credits : François Brunelle

This disparity indicates that the couples’ similar looks are due to their DNA rather than the surroundings in which they grew up. Dr. Esteller was taken aback by this finding since he anticipated a stronger environmental impact.

Therefore, genes, rather than shared experiences, are more likely to account for the doppelgangers’ striking similarities in appearance. It’s likely that population expansion is to blame for any resemblances between them. After all, one can only create so many different facial features.

Because of the rapid increase in the global population, Dr. Esteller claims that the system is constantly repeating itself. You should not be surprised to find a person that resembles you.

Stella Cappiello and Nunzia Girardi, Bari, Italy, 2015

Stella Cappiello and Nunzia Girardi, Bari, Italy, 2015
Image credits : François Brunelle

Dr. Esteller believes the study’s findings will aid medical professionals in the future in diagnosing patients’ conditions. It’s possible that individuals who have comparable appearances due to shared genetics also share similar health risks.

Director of the Englander Institute for Precision Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, Olivier Elemento, spoke in on the research, despite not being a part of it. He asserts that there seems to be a major genetic component behind the comparable genome-wide profiles of two people who have a similar appearance. He claimed that differences between people’s real looks and DNA predictions might help physicians identify issues.

Anna-Maria Tenta and Helena Joas, Munich, 2013

Anna-Maria Tenta and Helena Joas, Munich, 2013
Image credits : François Brunelle

Dr. Esteller further speculated that there could be a correlation between specific facial traits and behaviors. He speculated that the study’s findings may one day assist forensic science by identifying the individuals whose DNA has been linked to certain crimes. However, Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics postdoctoral researcher Daphne Martschenko, who was not involved in the study, cautioned against generalizing its findings to forensics.

Dr. Martschenko claims that the use of facial algorithms in a variety of contexts, including housing, employment, and criminal profiling, has already served to promote racial bias. He went on to remark that this research raises some serious ethical concerns.

Garrett Levenbrook and Roniel Tessler, New York, 2013

Garrett Levenbrook and Roniel Tessler, New York, 2013
Image credits : François Brunelle

Malone and Chasen argued that the look-alike project draws people together despite the potential dangers of associating physical appearance with genetics or behavior. They’ve been friends for 25 years, and Mr. Chasen contacted Mr. Malone to tell him the happy news that he was finally getting married last week.

To Mr. Malone, Mr. Brunelle’s photo project is “another way to connect all of us in the human race,” despite the fact that not everyone who has the same genetic code experiences the same sense of closeness.

Karen Chu and Ashlee Wong, Culver City, Calif., 2013

Karen Chu and Ashlee Wong, Culver City, Calif., 2013
Image credits : François Brunelle

Jeanne Bédard and Jessica Gagnon, Montréal, 2015

Jeanne Bédard and Jessica Gagnon, Montréal, 2015
Image credits : François Brunelle
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