Home Education Amazing Facts About the Japanese Educational System.

Amazing Facts About the Japanese Educational System.

In Japan, education is seen as a crucial stepping stone in one’s life. As a result, there are 210 school days in the year (compare it to the U.S., which has only 180 days). Although there are many parallels between the Japanese and other nations’ educational systems, there are certain elements that make this system one of the most successful in the world.

We discovered what sets the Japanese system apart from the rest, and we’re happy to share it with you. 

Sleeping is said to be a symbol of commitment.

Sleeping is said to be a symbol of commitment.
image credits : shutterstock.com

In Japan, falling asleep in class is a regular occurrence, owing to the school’s extremely hard schedule. In contrast to other nations, where sleeping in class is considered a sign of disrespect or laziness, napping in class is seen as a sign of commitment in Japan.

Japanese children do not take examinations until they are in fourth grade.

Japanese children do not take examinations until they are in fourth grade.
image credits : CDC / Unsplash, © Shutterstock.com

It may sound strange, but Japanese schools prioritize good manners over academic achievement. Their objective for the first three years is to mold their children’s personalities and instill good manners, not to test their knowledge. They learn to be generous, caring, and empathic. They’re also taught to respect others and to cultivate a peaceful relationship with nature and animals.

The students are in charge of cleaning the school.

The students are in charge of cleaning the school.
image credits : Madhourses / Depostiphotos.com, © DAJ / Getty Images

In contrast to the rest of the world, schools in Japan do not hire janitors or custodians to maintain the school clean. Students are in charge of keeping the classrooms, cafeterias, and even the restrooms clean.

Cleaning together, according to the Japanese educational system, trains pupils to help one another and work in groups. Students learn to appreciate their own work as well as the work of others by cleaning down desks, sweeping, and mopping the floors.

Children eat alongside their teacher in the classroom.

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In other places, witnessing a teacher dine with their pupils is unthinkable, but in Japan, this custom is seen as beneficial in fostering a healthy student-teacher relationship. While dining, you may have some really valuable talks that will help you establish a family environment.

image credits : lotusQ / Reddit

In addition, the Japanese educational system ensures that pupils get nutritious and balanced meals. As a result, lunch is prepared according to a standardized menu created by healthcare specialists and competent chefs in public elementary and junior high schools.

They participate in workshops after school.

They participate in workshops after school.
image credits : depositphotos.com

Japan has a large number of after-school programs and preparatory institutions. Apart from their 6-hour academic day, children can acquire new skills there. Most Japanese students take classes in the evenings in order to get admission to a reputable junior high school. Moreover, unlike many other students across the world, Japanese students study even on weekends and vacations.

Poetry and Japanese calligraphy are taught to Japanese pupils in addition to other subjects.

Poetry and Japanese calligraphy are taught to Japanese pupils in addition to other subjects.
image credits : Depositphotos.com

Japanese calligraphy, also known as Shodo, is an expressive and creative manner of writing meaningful kanji characters (Chinese letters used in the Japanese writing system).

Haiku, on the other hand, is a type of poetry in which readers are given powerful feelings through short syllables. This type of poetry is said to have cognitive, therapeutic, and aesthetic properties. Both of these programs educate youngsters to respect and appreciate their culture’s century-old customs.

Almost all students are required to wear school uniforms.

Almost all students are required to wear school uniforms.
image credits : © Depositphotos.com

In nearly every junior high school in Japan, the uniform policy is meant to break down boundaries and foster a sense of community, family, and togetherness among pupils. A dress code directs students’ focus to academics and growth while also encouraging youngsters to express themselves via means other than clothes.

Nameless Paints are used in Japanese schools.

Nameless Paints are used in Japanese schools.
image credits : Shutterstock.com

Nameless Paints are made up of only three primary colors: magenta, yellow, and cyan, with no other colors. The visual labeling technique also uses proportion to produce new shades of orange, green, or blue by displaying more or less of a different hue.

The formulas on the paint help kids learn some basic color theory ideas while also teaching them how to mix and create new colors in an entertaining way.

What is your country’s educational system like? Which of these approaches would you want to see used in your country’s schools?

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